The Lazy Lady’s Guide to DIY: Hanging Herb Garden

BobellaLadyguides12 Comments

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At some point near the middle of March, I always decide that I’m “done” with winter. The sweaters and jackets get pushed to the back of the closet, the flip flops come out, and I inevitably freeze my butt off for several weeks until the weather catches up with my warm-weather state of mind. Likewise, my cravings for fresh herbs and veggies are always a little ahead of the season.

Growing your own herbs is a great way to save money and avoid buying too much at a time and letting most of it go to waste. If it’s still too cold to plant outside where you are (or if you’re short on space!) this hanging herb garden is the perfect project to get you in gear for spring.

What you’ll need: Tin containers with snap-on plastic lids (tea, cocoa, and coffee cans are a good bet), coat hangers, pliers, scissors, herbs (I bought basil, rosemary, dill, and cilantro for about $2.50 each), masking tape, coffee filters, a nail, a hammer, X-acto knife, scrap fabric or paper, and glue or spray adhesive.

Herb Garden Before

After you’ve emptied and cleaned your cans, remove the bottom of the can with a can opener. Using the hammer and nail, punch 10-15 holes near the center.

Herb Garden Can Top

Slide the bottom inside the can, holding it up from inside. Tape the bottom in place about an inch from the outer edge of the can. (You could also use a hot glue gun.)  After you’ve got it good and stuck, punch two holes on opposite sides of the can about a quarter inch from the edge. These are the holes for the handle.

Taped Top

Flip the can over. Gently press the plant into the can. This part can get a little messy, so you might want to do it over the sink or outside.

 

Herb planted in can

Once you’ve got the herb in the can, take your coffee filter and cut a small diamond in the center, with a slit extending to the edge on one side.

 

Coffee filter

Fold the coffee filter around the herb and tape the edges together. Tape it to the can so that the top of the filter is tight. This will help prevent leaking and soil from falling out when you turn the can over.

 

Coffee filter taped to the can

Using your x-acto knife, cut a hole about 1-2 inches in diameter in the center of the plastic lid. The size of the hole really depends on the size of the plant. Too big and it will leak, too small and you might not be able to get the plant through it. When in doubt, go smaller.

 

A circular hole is cut in the lid.

This part is tricky: Carefully feed the plant through the hole in the plastic lid. The best way I’ve found to do this is to grasp the center of the plant, gathering all the leaves together, and gently twist it until it’s in a rope-like shape and isn’t poking out everywhere.

 

This part is tricky.

No herbs were harmed in the making of this project. (Until I ate them.)

Once you’ve got the lid snapped on, you can glue or tape it in place if the plant is especially big or heavy. Mine wasn’t, so I just left it snapped. Next, cut your fabric or paper into strips long enough to wrap around the can completely with a little overlap. Cut it wide enough so that there’s about a half inch extra around the top of the can (what used to be the bottom). You should probably have a cat hold the fabric in place for you.

Olive is helping

“You need this? Too bad, it’s my bed now.”

Hold the fabric so one edge is even with the bottom of the can, where the plant is poking out. Tape or glue the vertical edge of the fabric to the can, then wrap the fabric tightly around the can. You can use spray adhesive, glue, or clear tape to secure the fabric. Next, fold the extra half inch of fabric or paper inside the top of the can and glue or tape it in place. Be careful not to cover the holes for watering!

 

Wrap the fabric around the can.

To make the handles, use your pliers to cut about 6 inches of wire from the hangers. Bend it into a curve, then use the pliers to bend about 1/4-1/2 inch off the end into a right angle. Poke the ends through the holes you hammered out earlier, then use the pliers to squeeze the ends upward to secure it. I also made hooks for mine to make it easier to get them down for watering.

 

Herb garden after

You can hang your plants from curtain rods, hooks in the ceiling, or just about anywhere that gets plenty of light. I hung my herbs over the sink in my kitchen so they would be within easy reach while I was cooking. So far I haven’t had any problems with leaking, but you may want to avoid hanging your plants over hardwood floors or other surfaces that don’t take kindly to being dripped on.

 

Herb garden after 2

Yes, my cabinets really are this yellow.

This project could be tweaked in hundreds of ways. I originally planned to cover my cans in wood veneer and stain them for a more natural look, but had a hard time finding it locally. Sheet metal, wallpaper, wrapping paper, collage, or paint would also be great materials to use on these. And of course, you don’t have to grow herbs: you could also use these to grow hanging vines, flowers, tomatoes, peppers… the options are endless.

Happy growing!

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Bobella

I'm a twenty-something freelance writer and designer who lives in Memphis, TN with my husband, cat, and chinchilla. I require coffee and the internet to live.
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BobellaThe Lazy Lady’s Guide to DIY: Hanging Herb Garden

12 Comments on “The Lazy Lady’s Guide to DIY: Hanging Herb Garden”

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  1. Profile photo of kukla
    kukla

    What a great idea. I want to try it. Also love the photo with kitty. I can so relate! Esp with sewing pattern tissue – crunch crunch!

  2. Profile photo of Dormouse
    Dormouse

    This is brilliant and beautiful, and I can totally do this in my kitchen–even though it’s tiny! In fact, I think it will work especially well for my mini kitchen. :D

  3. Profile photo of jessicalouise
    jessicalouise

    This is an amazing idea!!!
    I, however, do not know a lot about growing anything, so I was wondering if you could help me out by informing me of which of the following would be suitable to grow like this?

    Chives, mint, oregano, parsley, sage and thyme…???
    Honestly I have no idea, so your help would be greatly appreciated!

    1. Profile photo of Bobella
      Bobella

      Any pet can be substituted for fabric-holding! (Actually, a large rock would probably be more helpful than my cat.)

  4. Profile photo of [E] Selena MacIntosh*
    [E] Selena MacIntosh*

    1. My kitchen and your kitchen are laid out the same way. KITCHEN TWINS!
    2. Your kitchen is way cuter than my kitchen.
    3. THIS PROJECT IS ADORABLE AND I CAPSLOCK LOVE IT.

  5. Profile photo of CrabbyCakes
    CrabbyCakes

    I am doing this this weekend. I’ll need them to hang outright, though, or I’m afraid the cats will try to attack them. I think it should be easy to mod this to flip it over, right?

    1. Profile photo of Bobella
      Bobella

      Oh yeah, definitely. All you’d have to do is put the holes near the top of the can and leave the bottom the way it is!

  6. Profile photo of tart.
    tart.

    !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    I am literally sitting here with my mouth hanging open. I love fresh herbs – rosemary and chives especially – and this WILL happen at my house. I even have an old skirt that I’ve been saving for no good reason other than I love the print, and it totally matches my kitchen. Thank you!!

    1. Profile photo of Anna C
      Anna C

      A. I need to make the herb things.
      B. I also now know what to do with my favorite skirt that is damaged beyond my ability to repair.

      DOUBLE ZINGA.

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