Morbid Curiosity: Canada Day!

Happy Canada Day, Persephoneers! I’m a Canadian lady, so on this most Canadian of days I’m whipping out ALL THE PATRIOTISM! (And maple syrup.)

My recipes today come from Pierre & Janet Burton’s Canadian Food Guide.  (Non-Canadians: Pierre Burton was one of the most popular Canadian historians of all time.  OF ALL TIME! If you don’t believe me, just look at his Wikipedia page. You can’t throw a microfiche reader in the Canadian history section of your library without hitting one of his books. And check out the majestic sideburns he had…)

pierre and janet burton's canadian food guide
Just look at how awesome they are!

My Canada Day recipes are Maple Mousse and Maple Rum Cooler. Because what’s more Canadian than maple syrup? Nothing, that’s what! According to Pierre and Janet Burton, these two recipes were adapted from The Royal Victoria Cook Book, published in 1900.

Maple Rum Cooler and Maple Mousse
Patriotism!

I found a maple leaf-shaped candy dish that looked perfect for making a Maple Mousse in. The only trouble is, mousse doesn’t un-mould the same way a gelatine does, so I had to leave it in the dish. As should be expected in two dishes where the key ingredient is maple syrup, these are both rather sweet. If sweet isn’t your thing, you should stay far, far away from these because your blood sugar levels will go up just looking at them.

You could make the Maple Rum Cooler without rum, if you wanted to, or if it isn’t a good idea for you to drink rum in the middle of the day. I had to drink it with the rum, though, you see… for research purposes. This is a very important cultural/historical study.  Of course, if you do drink a large rum cooler in the middle of the day with nothing but a bit of maple syrup mousse on your stomach, you might think it’s a super patriotic idea to dress up like a lumberjack and draw a sexy beard on your face with the stub of an old eyeliner pencil. Not that I did that. [Nonchalant whistling.]

Maple Mousse
Pour 1 cup maple syrup into a saucepan and stir in the beaten yolks of 4 eggs. Heat until thick, being careful not to burn. Remove from fire and chill. Then mix gently with 1 pint of cream, whipped stiff. Turn into a mould and refrigerate until cold.

Maple Mousse 1

Maple Rum Cooler
In a tall glass, filled with ice cubes, pour in 2 ox. white rum, 1 tbsp. maple syrup and 1 tbsp. lemon juice. Fill to the top with iced tea and serve.

Maple Rum Cooler

The recipes featured here are from Pierre & Janet Burton’s Canadian Food Guide (revised edition), published in 1974 by Pierre Berton Enterprises Ltd.

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Jen R. L. Disarray

Jen was once described as a "culinary anthropologist". She liked that. When she is not making questionable foods, Jen enjoys reading, sassing, and lurking all over the internet. Jen has a blog called Maybe We Shouldn't Be Eating This, and she is a contributor to the Geekquality podcast and blog.

20 thoughts on “Morbid Curiosity: Canada Day!”

  1. My father’s family, who all hail from Southern Ontario, will put an inch and a half of maple syrup in a bowl, and just eat it. Just eat it with a spoon. It’s like a high delicacy. They also make their own maple syrup. It’s intense.

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