This OT is Dancing on Its Own

Sometimes your week just needs a kick-ass anthem with some awesome dancing.

Y’all, this has been my jam for the past two weeks. It’s on repeat on every music-playing device I own.

So, join me in a Thursday night dance party? Or just come on in and tell us about your week so far!

 

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[E] Rachel

I punctuate sentences with Oxford commas, and I punctuate disagreements with changesocks. Proud curmudgeon. Get off my lawn.

132 thoughts on “This OT is Dancing on Its Own”

  1. So, a question of etiquite: A friend asked me on Monday if I wanted to go out to see a movie this evening. No fixed plans just the vauge idea. No communication until after that until I messaged her this morning to try and pick something fixed. How late in the day should I wait before I can make other plans?

      1. The problem is she can’t take calls at work (texting works because it doesn’t make noise). I don’t wanna be the obnoxious twit who sends 80 texts, but I don’t wanna be the obnoxious twit who didn’t get in contact and then just made other plans.

  2. http://www.guardian.co.uk/education/2012/mar/14/cambridge-student-ban-protest-david-willetts?fb=native&CMP=FBCNETTXT9038

    Hey guys. At Cambridge University a student was recently suspended for protesting a speech by the Higher Education minister, David Willetts. Basically, Cambridge students are supposed to have the right to protest speeches at the University they disagree with (it’s been going on for hundreds of years, not to mention duh, freedom of speech). Those involved with the protest have basically copped to it and said “suspend us too”, and now there’s a petition going around to protest the suspension.

    The reason this is so controversial is that opposition to the current higher education policy is not at all unique to these students; it’s a pretty mainstream view, and this student is being penalised by his University for protesting the advocacy of higher education policy he disagrees with. A lot of people involved with it here in Cambridge basically see it as a thinly veiled attempt at censorship of the view altogether.

    The petition is below if you’d like to sign/support the cause. =)

    http://www.ipetitions.com/petition/support-suspended-cambridge-university-student/

  3. If anyone is in Raleigh/Raleigh-ish area, there’s a movie tonight at the Galaxy in Cary called ‘Indie Game: The Movie.’ The 7 p.m. show is sold out, but there’s a 9:30 show for night-owls. Let me know if you’d be interested in going; Epic is having an afterparty too!

      1. There’s not a lot of functional difference for this Midwestern American either. This is I suspect where everyone thinking it is ok to call a man Patty came from. Americans who don’t always pronounce the double t and the double d differently.

            1. No, but I pronounce oregano “ore-gah-no”, find it inhumanly difficult to pronounce “Hawaii” correctly (I always pronounce it Ha-whye instead of drawing any difference between the last two syllables) and I have legitimately said “arks” instead of “ask”.

              I basically have Catherine Tate’s accent in a guy.

              1. I pronounce roof “rough,” and lasher “la-shere” (this is specifically a Detroit holdover from being French I think. It’s the name of a major street and I think that’s how the pronunciation has held out), but I seem to have avoided most of the usual Midwest accent quirks. No “malk” instead of milk or unusual r appearing in the middle of wash.

                1. Suis Je Bovvered Though? Regarde Mon Visage, Regarde Mon Visage, Mon Visage. Est-qu visage bovvered? Non, pas-qu june suis pas bovvered! Est-qu voidrais disrespecta ma famille? Est-qu palusa ma mere une pikey? Est-qu palusa mon pere un gipo. Regarde visage? Regarde est-qu mon visage bovvered? Par Bovvered? Par Bovvered? Par Bovvered? Thierry Henry? Par Bovvered? Par bovvered? Par bovvered? Frera Jacqa, Frera Jacqa? Un kilo de pom? Un kilo de pom? Je pas bovvered, Je pas bovvered, Je pas bovvered. ‘Allo, ‘Allo, ROONEH, ROONEH! Regarde Mon Visage. I AIN’T BOVVERED

                    1. @KellsBells

                      It was done as part of Comic Relief, which is an annual comedic show for charity. So it’s technically not the Catherine Tate Show, but a crossover. They do loads of splice-sketches every year, usually between the weirdest shows possible.

          1. Oh I am fully on team Patty is a girl’s name, not an acceptable alternative to Patrick. That’s just me postulating the possible origin of this weirdness.

            ETA: Pronunciation wise it is far closer to Paddy. It’s just that butter sounds like “budder” coming from us.

        1. Eh, personally I don’t think it matters much. Mr. Donovan is very serious about his Irish heritage and he doesn’t think it’s a big deal.

          He didn’t appreciate the depiction of Irish terrorists on the episode of MI5 we just watched, however.

          ETA: Since I’m also the person who thinks it’s cool that Versailles, Missouri is pronounced “Ver-sales,” the argument could be made that I’m just hopelessly uncouth. :)

          1. Oh god, you’ll never make anyone happy that way. Depict Irish Republicans well and British people get irritated at the justification of what they see as Western terrorism from the same places that condemn Islamic terrorism, depict them badly and Irish people get irritated at the slander of Irish Republicanism. It’s very rarely been done well at all, and when it is it’s usually painfully neutral.

              1. Well, I mean – my mother almost comically has both biases at the same time because she’s Irish but she married a British army officer and has lived in the UK for most of her life; she had uncles who died as part of the IRA (and as a result feels strongly about the depiction of the IRA) but my Dad also had colleagues (her friends) who died being attacked by the IRA, so she has a contradictory and very strong instinct not to whitewash the crimes of the IRA as she sees it. I think it’s a case of being defensive about your own group, especially if you have direct connections to people who died in the conflict.

                It’s…well, I can understand why people get angry on both sides. It’s the same sort of pattern of thinking that underlines any very long-term conflict; mutual recrimination, probably valid in parts from both sides.

          2. It matters to this Irish person! And the one who built the site, and all of us who are sharing it…

            All respect to Mr. Donovan but having Irish heritage is rarely the same thing as actually being Irish.

            ETA: I mean, yes, it’s minor in the grand scheme of world peace etc., but it is an annoyance for (lots/most of)  us.

              1. I do:)

                Aw about the tattoo! But if you’d gotten it too close it might have still been healing this weekend, whereas if you get it afterwards it’ll definitely be healed for Paddy’s Day next year! (trying to see the silver lining:) ).

          3. I drove to a conference in the Midwest once with my French Canadian MSc supervisor, and we made a lunch stop in Terre Haute, which, as any Canadian with a lick of French can tell is, is pronounced (roughly) like “tare oat.”  Apparently people there pronounced it “tara hoot,” which…. grates on the ear.  And baffles a van load of grumpy Canadians.

    1. Had a brain fart and could not for the life of me remember what PSA was, googled it and somehow I dont think you’re recommending a prostate-specific antigen for the weekend! And a yes re the patty thingie, instinctual claw curling going on lol

       

  4. Abortion in Texas: everyone halfway interested in reproductive rights and basic decency needs to read this: http://blogs.bmj.com/medical-ethics/2012/03/16/how-abortion-law-works-in-texas/

    Trigger warning for pregnancy loss

    “I don’t want to have to do this at all,” I told her. “I’m doing this to prevent my baby’s suffering. I don’t want another sonogram when I’ve already had two today. I don’t want to hear a description of the life I’m about to end. Please,” I said, “I can’t take any more pain.”

    ….

    “I’m so sorry that I have to do this,” the doctor told us, “but if I don’t, I can lose my license.”  Before he could even start to describe our baby, I began to sob until I could barely breathe.  Somewhere, a nurse cranked up the volume on a radio, allowing the inane pronouncements of a DJ to dull the doctor’s voice.  Still, despite the noise, I heard him.  His unwelcome words echoed off sterile walls while I, trapped on a bed, my feet in stirrups, twisted away from his voice.

     

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