On Reparations, Gentrification, the Role of Police, and Other Intellectual Pursuits

I know all you bookish and clever women have read  quite a bit over the last year. What’s the hardest/best thing you’ve read lately? Read More On Reparations, Gentrification, the Role of Police, and Other Intellectual Pursuits

The Best Books I’ve Read So Far This Year

Hello again, bookish and clever ladies! I’m here today to share the best books I’ve read so far this year. It’s time to do some reflecting on the last many months and separate the wheat from the chaff. (Is that actually something people say? I’m saying it.) Read More The Best Books I’ve Read So Far This Year

Soup of the Day: Garbage Soup for Your Soul

January is the long, long Monday of the soul. Everyone is sick, the days aren’t noticeably longer yet, we’re all buried under a few feet of snow, and temperatures are hovering around bone-chilling. On top of all that, I got four impacted wisdom teeth removed last week (the former homes of which have now turned a weird color and I think I’m being colonized by flesh-eating bacteria, don’t worry about it) and I have been woozy and stupid from pain medication for far, far too long. Read More Soup of the Day: Garbage Soup for Your Soul

Leagues and Leagues of Remarkable Women

It is utterly classic for me to get extraordinarily enthusiastic about a project and then, slowly and inevitably, get dragged down in to the muck and the mire of the details of getting it going. For instance: as a child, I spent hours sculpting the characters for the stories I was of course going to write — excel spreadsheets with the color of hair, shape of forehead, style of dress, and on and on and on. The stories themselves never got all that far off the ground. Read More Leagues and Leagues of Remarkable Women

Book Review: The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness, by Michelle Alexander

This book had been on my to-read list for a few years, which is not an unusually long time for me. I knew, though, that I had to prioritize this one when I saw Angela Davis speak in Hyde Park last month. She spoke about feminism and race and Assata Shakur (if you haven’t heard her story go look it up!) – and the issue of abolition. I had never heard of this movement, though I knew theoretically that the so-called war on drugs fell disproportionately heavily on black and brown men – and growing numbers of women. This book was one of the ones that she recommended for those of us that didn’t already have an intimate knowledge of what she was talking about already to pick up and read. Read More Book Review: The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness, by Michelle Alexander

Book Reflections: “Queen of America” and “Revolution”

Last night I finished a book that my 15-year-old sister recommended to me. She may have recommended it to me a few years back – I have a massive to-read list (let’s talk books!), but I always get to things eventually. Between this book and the last that I read, I’ve been pretty immersed in other people’s worlds. That escape mechanism is an old one of mine: stressful life? Not really particularly sure what’s going on? Be somebody else. Read More Book Reflections: “Queen of America” and “Revolution”