Badass Ladies of History: Jackie “Moms” Mabley

“Wouldn’t y’all vote for me to be president? That’s right, I can’t make it no worse! If Elizabeth can run England, I can run America. What has she got that I didn’t use to have and can’t get again, that’s what I want to know.” ““ Moms Mabley Read More Badass Ladies of History: Jackie “Moms” Mabley

Badass Ladies of History: Marion Wong

In 1916, 21-year-old Marion Wong wrote, directed, and produced the first film by a Chinese American and one of the first by a woman. The Curse of Quon Gwon, the story of Chinese American lovers cursed by the god of war and wealth, abandoned Hollywood stereotypes in favor of more realistic portrayals of Americans of Asian descent. The film has captured the attention of historians and documentary filmmakers in recent years, but the story of its bold, young, female creator is less known. Read More Badass Ladies of History: Marion Wong

From the Archives: Badass Ladies of History: Katherine Sui Fun Cheung

Editor’s note: We’re dusting off a few pieces from the archives this week in honor of APA Heritage Month.

Katherine Sui Fun Cheung was born in Canton, China in 1904 and immigrated to the United States in 1921 to live with her father and study music. One afternoon soon after her arrival, Cheung’s father took her to an airfield to teach her to drive a car. Instead, she became enamored of the airplanes taking off and landing in the distance. Read More From the Archives: Badass Ladies of History: Katherine Sui Fun Cheung

From the Archives: Miné Okubo: Citizen 13660

Editor’s Note:  In honor of APA Heritage Month, we’re re-running a couple of our older pieces you may have missed.

In the months following the attack on Pearl Harbor, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, which created military zones covering one-third of the nation. At the behest of nativist groups, opportunistic politicans, and military leaders, a series of presidential proclamations followed which defined Japanese, German, and Italian immigrants as “enemy aliens.” Read More From the Archives: Miné Okubo: Citizen 13660

Coming to Terms with an Imperfect Idol

I love Myrna Loy. It started with the Thin Man films, a series of murder mysteries starring William Powell as a private detective named Nick Charles and Loy as his wife, Nora. Nick was very much the typical 1930s film male: dapper, quick-witted, drunk, and sexist. Rather than accept her husband’s conduct, Nora cut through Nick’s misogyny with rolled eyes and biting comments, refusing to take his obnoxious behavior seriously. Read More Coming to Terms with an Imperfect Idol

Badass Ladies of History: Katherine Sui Fun Cheung

Katherine Sui Fun Cheung was born in Canton, China in 1904 and immigrated to the United States in 1921 to live with her father and study music. One afternoon soon after her arrival, Cheung’s father took her to an airfield to teach her to drive a car. Instead, she became enamored of the airplanes Read More Badass Ladies of History: Katherine Sui Fun Cheung

Badass Ladies of History: Jovita Idár

In the early 20th century, a teacher, a journalist, a nurse, an education reformer, and a political activist served the people of South Texas, teaching children who were shut out of public education, exposing law enforcement involvement in racial violence, organizing nurses for the Mexican Revolution, and protesting President Woodrow Wilson’s policies toward Mexico. Read More Badass Ladies of History: Jovita Idár

Zitkala-Å a: Nom de Defiance

Forced to inhabit multiple worlds, Zitkala-Å a dedicated her life to art and activism, challenging authority and exposing corruption in a government that did not consider Native Americans worthy of raising their own children, preserving their own cultures, or accessing citizenship and legal rights. Read More Zitkala-Å a: Nom de Defiance