Record Machine: The Art of Drowning by AFI

Released in 2000, The Art of Drowning is one of the few albums I have on vinyl that belonged to my husband first. We’d both seen AFI perform at the same show in Bozeman, Montana, though we didn’t know each other at the time. He had no turntable, but he still purchased the record, and copied a friend’s CD. Two years later, we received a turntable as a Christmas present. My fondness for the album may have a lot to do with our coincidental concert-going, but The Art of Drowning is one of AFI’s best, if not arguably the best album.

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Book Review: The Taliban Cricket Club by Timeri N. Murari

With the news of England’s women winning the Ashes, it’s a good time for the women’s game. The teams will play a return series in the winter, where, with a bit of effort on behalf of the cricket boards, their games could draw bigger audiences and increased reporting. Read More Book Review: The Taliban Cricket Club by Timeri N. Murari

P-Mag Nostalgia Project: 2000 with Amanda

I was so elated when I was chosen for a section of  the Nostalgia Project, I could hardly stand it, and this year turned out to be an especially great one. I was amazed at how many things that ended up defining my early teenage years came out this year. And heeeeeeere we go! Read More P-Mag Nostalgia Project: 2000 with Amanda

30 Years of Music: 2000!

People, wasn’t 2000 only just yesterday? I swear that it was, even though I was still in high school then and still driving Sid The Angry Volvo (R.I.P.), and even though the musicians in some of these videos look like babies in comparison to now, 2000 just happened. Don’t spoil my illusion just yet.

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As-Yet-Unnamed Music Column: Kirsty MacColl

It’s February! Is the northern hemisphere finally getting warmer? Where I sit, no, it’s not, really. But you’re in luck, Persephoneers, because I have an album that will warm you right up. Tropical Brainstorm, the last album from the late, great, much-missed Kirsty MacColl, opens with a rill of Cuban steel drums and joyous voices cheering, and that gorgeous energy doesn’t let up until the final track. Read More As-Yet-Unnamed Music Column: Kirsty MacColl