Book Review: Season of Mists, by Jen Corkill

Penny Dreadful won’t be back until next summer, and the end of the season left me with a hangover. No worries, though, there’s a plethora of novels and book series in the same vein that can give me the same fix Penny Dreadful does. Season of Mists, by Jen Corkill, is the first book in a promising historical paranormal romance series that does just that. Read More Book Review: Season of Mists, by Jen Corkill

Book Review: Forever Your Earl, by Eva Leigh

Eva Leigh begins with a promising start to her new Wicked Quills of London series with its first installment, Forever Your Earl. Leigh takes us from the finest houses to the poorest slums of Regency London in this delectable treat of a book. Read More Book Review: Forever Your Earl, by Eva Leigh

Book Review: The Middle of Somewhere, by Sonja Yoerg

In Sonja Yoerg’s novel The Middle of Somewhere, Liz Kroft is about to turn thirty, but for someone so young, she has a lot of emotional baggage she needs to work through. The opportunity presents itself when she decides to take a solitary hike on the John Muir Trail in the Yosemite Valley. When her boyfriend Dante joins her, though, her plans change, and the secrets she carries become an unpleasant weight for her. Throughout their journey, they encounter a host of different characters: an actor who is unwillingly making the hike for a movie role; a devoted older couple who found love the second time around; and a pair of sinister brothers, both professional outdoorsmen, who have their own secrets to hide as well. Read More Book Review: The Middle of Somewhere, by Sonja Yoerg

Book Review: The Only Woman in the Room: Why Science Is Still a Boys’ Club, by Eileen Pollack

I’m very interested in exposing the ways that women are discouraged from taking an interest in STEM fields, so Eileen Pollack’s The Only Woman in the Room: Why Science Is Still a Boys’ Club was an automatic add to my to-read list. While it wasn’t quite what I expected, it’s still a valuable resource for women like me who loved science and math but were discouraged from pursuing those subjects and, perhaps more importantly, for teachers and scientists who may not realize that their unconscious behaviors push women away.  Read More Book Review: The Only Woman in the Room: Why Science Is Still a Boys’ Club, by Eileen Pollack

Book Review: The Word Made Flesh, edited by Eva Talmadge and Justin Taylor

Filled with photos and personal stories, The Word Made Flesh: Literary Tattoos from Bookworms Worldwide has not only direct quotes, but tattoos that involve portraiture, illustrations and even simple punctuation marks. It’s a beautiful tribute to the written word.

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Book Review: Devotion: A Memoir by Dani Shapiro

When I was ten years old, I decided I would no longer eat pork. Partly brought on by the appreciation for the animal itself, I realized that I’d never much liked pork to begin with. Rather than say to people something like, “Well, I hate pork chops, but sometimes I end up eating sausage when my mom makes red beans and rice,” it was easier to eliminate it entirely.

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Book Review: Daughter of Deep Silence by Carrie Ryan

Part Revenge, part Pretty Little Liars, Daughter of Deep Silence by Carrie Ryan is an absolute summer treat. In this delightful melange of suspense and romance, Ryan keeps you on the edge of your seat guessing until the very end. Read More Book Review: Daughter of Deep Silence by Carrie Ryan

Book Review: Uprooted by Naomi Novik

All her life, Agnieszka has known two things: that she must stay away from the Wood at all costs, and that every ten years, the Dragon emerges from his tower to select a girl to serve him for the next ten years. (He’s not the fire-breathing sort of dragon, but rather the wizard tasked with protecting their valley.) She knows all too well the horrors inflicted when the Wood claims a victim, but she’s not terribly concerned about the Dragon. After all, everyone has known all their lives that her best friend, Kasia, will become his chosen companion when they come of age; Kasia is lovely and graceful and does everything well, while Agnieszka is hopelessly clumsy and not at all ladylike. Too bad wizards don’t always do what people expect… Read More Book Review: Uprooted by Naomi Novik