This Week in Misogyny: “Iron-Knickered Feminist Lingerie-Arsonist” Edition

The world continues to be a horrible place this week. Let’s keep fighting the good fight, ladies! (Trigger warnings for pretty much everything apply.) Read More This Week in Misogyny: “Iron-Knickered Feminist Lingerie-Arsonist” Edition

Science News: 5/7/13

This week, science will both enrage and delight you. We’ve got extinctions, global warming deniers, and conspiracy theorists, but also the world’s smallest movie and a beautifully terrifying trip inside an active volcano, plus a look at how pregnancy shapes evolution. Let’s go! Read More Science News: 5/7/13

Science News: 3/26/13

So many cool science stories this week! Conditions were right for there to have been life on Mars! Daisy Morris, dinosaur hunter, is the coolest 9-year-old on the planet. And can earthquakes really turn water to gold? Read More Science News: 3/26/13

A 50-State Guide to the 2012 Election

By now, you most likely know who you’re voting for in the presidential election. You probably have an idea of who to vote for in your local congressional race and for the Senate if one of your state’s seats is being re-elected this year. When it comes to local elections, though, it can be harder to find information about who’s running, and ballot initiatives or propositions can be even more confusing (especially since they’re frequently worded in such a way as to be either deliberately ambiguous or to have inadvertent side effects). Below, you’ll find links to the official election guides and Ballotpedia pages for all 50 states plus DC, info on all Senate races and some significant House races, details on most of the ballot initiatives being decided across the country this week, and links to alternate voting plans for some states affected by Hurricane Sandy. Read More A 50-State Guide to the 2012 Election

Where are the Scientists on the House Science Committee?

The Constitution doesn’t spell out many requirements to become a member of the U.S. House of Representatives. You have to be at least 25 years old, a resident of the state you wish to represent, and you must have been a U.S. citizen for at least 7 years (and, of course, you have to get yourself elected). Once you become a representative, however, there doesn’t seem to be any particular skill set or knowledge base required to get yourself assigned to the committees that do much of the real work, particularly the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology. The lack of any sort of scientific knowledge displayed by some members of this committee is absolutely horrifying. Read More Where are the Scientists on the House Science Committee?

No Legislation Without Fat And Female Representation

Unless you’ve been living under a lovely rock this week (and I would love to crawl under there with you), you’ve heard about the Congressional investigation into the Affordable Care Act’s birth control mandate spearheaded by Congressman Issa.

Here’s an image showing who was allowed to speak. Read More No Legislation Without Fat And Female Representation