Pride Books: The Unreal Life of Sergey Nabokov by Paul Russell

When I read the description for The Unreal Life of Sergey Nabokov, I was intrigued – how does the younger, gay brother of a literary icon conduct his life? How dark is that shadow? The minutiae, the great secrets, and of course, loves of a person’s life are endlessly interesting to me, so I hoped that this book would scratch that itch. Because only limited details of Sergey’s life are documented, Paul Russell chose to write a novel instead of a biography. The result is a beautiful, lonely story about a man who has a lifelong struggle with happiness.

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Bookshelf Revisited: Molly Murphy Mysteries #3, “For the Love of Mike” by Rhys Bowen

Molly Murphy is trying to get her career as an investigator off the ground in a world that thinks women should stick to needlepoint.

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Bookshelf Revisited: Molly Murphy Mysteries #2, “Death of Riley” by Rhys Bowen

In Molly Murphy’s world, women don’t become detectives. They marry and stay home, or they take one of a handful of respectable jobs until they find someone to marry.

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Bookshelf Revisited: Molly Murphy Mysteries #1, “Murphy’s Law” by Rhys Bowen

Molly Murphy is a feisty Irish immigrant living in early-1900s New York City, where she solves mysteries and often deals with misogynistic blowhards. Read More Bookshelf Revisited: Molly Murphy Mysteries #1, “Murphy’s Law” by Rhys Bowen

Book Review: The Abortionist’s Daughter by Elisa DeCarlo

Recently, the mister noted that I’ve become somewhat preoccupied with early 1900s “upper-crusty British people,” as he put it. Taking a look at my Netflix viewing and some of my reading, he’s not wrong. Though set in New York, Elisa DeCarlo’s The Abortionist’s Daughter fits snugly within a genre rife with burgeoning feminism and class considerations that are much like our young nation’s parent country.

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Historical [Fiction] Trauma

This essay is part of a year long series following one fed-up reader’s white literature “detox.” Read more here, and follow her book list here.

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The Year of Reading Women: Hilary Mantel

Hilary Mantel makes for a good literary celebrity around here: She’s won the Booker Prize twice, and the stage adaptations of her winning books are doing well. She’s progressed so far in the celebrity circus that her views are now “controversial” (the media love bringing up her words about the Duchess of Cambridge, although nobody has bothered to read the whole transcript of the speech in question, so pretty normal procedure there). I suspect she wishes she wasn’t quite so famous by now. Read More The Year of Reading Women: Hilary Mantel

Book Review: Viper Wine by Hermione Eyre

Brand new and amazingly weird and wonderful, Viper Wine was an unexpected present that gave me a lot of entertainment. I’ve only recently started reading historical novels, which means I haven’t had the time to delve further into the subject, so any advance praise for Hermione Eyre and her first novel had passed me by. Read without any further information in the back of my mind, the novel left me puzzled at first. Read More Book Review: Viper Wine by Hermione Eyre