International Women’s Issues: Bride Kidnapping in Kyrgyzstan

Several weeks ago, a friend of mine commented on my ability to make the Internet 100% Sad, according to the mood meter at the bottom of that week’s International Women’s Issues post. She, a specialist on the former Soviet Union, then suggested I write about Kyrgyz bride kidnapping, but warned me that again, 100% sadness would most likely ensue. Read More International Women’s Issues: Bride Kidnapping in Kyrgyzstan

International Women’s Issues: HIV/AIDS and Women in Botswana

This week’s column aims to examine the impact of HIV/AIDS on women in Botswana, with significant exploration into what is being done, both internationally and by local women, to combat this disease.

I should point out here that, since HIV/AIDS is such a major issue, and has been one for several decades at this point, there is a tremendous amount of information available on the topic. I’ve done my best to provide a comprehensive overview below, but please, if you’re interested, check out the sources at the end for more information. Read More International Women’s Issues: HIV/AIDS and Women in Botswana

International Women’s Issues: The Worst Country in the World for Women

This week in International Women’s Issues, I’m focusing on Yemen. Why? Because, time and time again, Yemen holds the title of The Worst Place in the World To Live if You are a Woman. There are a variety of factors that contribute to this ignoble distinction, which I will examine. There are also, happily, a number of women working incredibly hard, risking their lives to improve the living situations of their fellow countrywomen. Most notable, perhaps, is recent Nobel Peace Prize winner, Tawakkol Karman, whose work in Yemen’s Arab Spring movement earned her the nickname “Mother of the Revolution.” Later in this piece, we’ll look at her work, and the work of women like her. Read More International Women’s Issues: The Worst Country in the World for Women

International Women’s Issues: Economic Empowerment in Cambodia

In this column’s perpetual continent-hopping, we’re back in Asia this week ““ Southeast Asia, specifically. And when one thinks of women’s rights in Southeast Asia, human trafficking and sex work automatically come to mind. But that’s not what I’m focusing on this week, at least not directly. Read More International Women’s Issues: Economic Empowerment in Cambodia

International Women’s Issues: We Need to Talk About Haitian Women

On January 12, 2010, Haiti was struck by a massive earthquake. Nearly two years later, over a million people ““ between 1 and 1.3 million, to be precise ““ are still living in the camps. A cholera epidemic is currently taking place, and the refugee camps are incredibly unsafe for women and girls, as sexual abuse is unfortunately incredibly common. Read More International Women’s Issues: We Need to Talk About Haitian Women

International Women’s Issues: Romani Women in Romania

We return to Europe this week in International Women’s Issues. And really, if you’re going to write about the worldwide struggle for women’s rights, and this is a Europe Week in your globe-hopping, you have to write about the Roma. Read More International Women’s Issues: Romani Women in Romania

International Women’s Issues: Let’s Give Thanks

After explaining last week’s post topic to my mother, she suggested that I write about something cheerful this week. “It’s Thanksgiving ““ write about what we should be thankful for in women’s rights!” It’s a pretty good idea. The news that gets airtime is usually bad news, and at least in the U.S., the recent conservative onslaught against women’s rights can sometimes be overwhelming. Still, there are good things happening, albeit perhaps not in the U.S. at the moment. Which is why I’ll look internationally, and focus this week on advancements, both globally and regionally, in women’s rights. Read More International Women’s Issues: Let’s Give Thanks

International Women’s Issues: Obstetric Fistula in Niger

This post needs a bit of a warning. The way I see things, there are issues that affect everyone to varying degrees, and then there are issues that directly affect mostly women.  In an effort to counterbalance the mainstream view that “women’s issues” tend to mainly involve rape, domestic violence, maternal mortality, access to contraception and the like, I have stayed away from topics in that sphere. As I said in my first post, every issue is a women’s issue, and my columns thus far have been written with that idea in mind. At the same time, I am also concerned that I have been ignoring more serious issues. This is partially because, to be honest, it can be tough to read and write about some of these things. Read More International Women’s Issues: Obstetric Fistula in Niger