This Week in Misogyny: On Ray Rice, the NFL, and Domestic Violence

Let’s talk about the Ray Rice situation. (Trigger warning: domestic violence. The actual elevator footage is not included in the post, but can be found at many of the links.) Read More This Week in Misogyny: On Ray Rice, the NFL, and Domestic Violence

This Week in Misogyny is Staging a Topless Protest

We’ve got lots of cool readings this week, ranging from confused MRAs who don’t understand cat-based satire to why Cosmo‘s sex positions for lesbians are ridiculous. But there’s a lot of bad news too, including Ray Rice’s two-fucking-game suspension, assaults at SDCC, and slut-shaming Nicki Minaj and the Bachelorette. (As usual, trigger warnings for pretty much everything apply. Read More This Week in Misogyny is Staging a Topless Protest

Keith Olbermann’s Final Countdown

I wish someone would just tell me how to feel about Olbermann’s sudden, contract-rending departure from MSNBC. Currently I’m torn between thinking the Hillary-demonizing, Assange-defending narcissist had it coming, and being genuinely saddened that lefties have lost the largest, shiniest jewel in their commentating crown. Read More Keith Olbermann’s Final Countdown

The Business of Hating and Being Hated

The saying “You can catch more flies with honey than vinegar” has gone out of vogue, mostly because flies don’t support haute couture habits, nor will they finance a 100-acre estate. If you want to be rich,  throw out the honey and the vinegar; invest in pepper spray. In America anyway, a good number of the wealthy and (in)famous scaled the economic pyramid because, not in spite of, their reputation as rabble-rousing malcontents, the mean boys and girls who are unafraid to inspire a little hatred and a lot of indigestion. Read More The Business of Hating and Being Hated

On #MooreandMe, Pt. I: How the Rhetorical “Rape Card” Silences Women

On December 15, Sady Doyle of Tiger Beatdown launched #Mooreandme, the Twitter hashtag protest designed to call out progressive icon Michael Moore, and while Moore has since clarified his views and voiced an apology to Doyle, the #MooreandMe tag lives on.

Jockeying over the legitimacy of the accusations against Assange has metastasized into wider debate about the nature of rape allegations everywhere, whether accusers/accused should be shielded behind anonymity, and whether women have an ace in the hole in the form of the so-called “rape card.” Read More On #MooreandMe, Pt. I: How the Rhetorical “Rape Card” Silences Women