Book Review: Marie Antoinette, Serial Killer, by Kate Alender

What do you get when you mix the familiar story of a vengeful ghost, the sad end Marie Antoinette met at the scaffold in October of 1793, and a young American teenager in Paris? You get Marie Antoinette, Serial Killer, by Katie Alender. Read More Book Review: Marie Antoinette, Serial Killer, by Kate Alender

What I Watched Last Night: The Rose of Versailles, Episode One, Oscar, The Destiny of a Rose

So Bastille Day occurred this weekend, and with all of the terrible news that came out, I decided to celebrate July 14 with a rewatch of the first few episodes of the anime The Rose of Versailles, which has only recently been released on DVD.

Read More What I Watched Last Night: The Rose of Versailles, Episode One, Oscar, The Destiny of a Rose

The Chemise a la Reine, an Eighteenth-century Fashion Trend

In 1783, Marie Antoinette scandalized her subjects when she had court artist Louise Élisabeth Vigée Le Brun paint this portrait of her. Read More The Chemise a la Reine, an Eighteenth-century Fashion Trend

A Wronged Woman: The Portrayal of Madame du Barry

A French Revolution blogger recently remarked on the portrayal of Louis XV’s mistress, Jeanne du Barry, in many books about Marie Antoinette. Madame du Barry is shown as an uncouth whore with little to no manners, an inferior to the fresh, polished dauphine Marie Antoinette, who takes great pleasure in slighting her. The rivalry between Louis XV’s maitresse-en-titre and the young dauphine was the talk of Versailles in the last years of his reign, but many works of fiction tend to take Marie Antoinette’s part in it. After all, Jeanne du Barry was nothing more than the king’s whore, whereas Marie Antoinette was the daughter of the Austrian empress and a member of a family who could trace themselves back to the Roman nobility. Read More A Wronged Woman: The Portrayal of Madame du Barry

An Eighteenth-century French Case of Mudslinging

Let’s be honest here: We’ve seen some really nasty anti-Obama stuff come out within the last four years, and we always complain about how nasty political ads are during election season. Sometimes we wonder if a it’s a solely American trait, since there are several past instances of election campaigns getting downright and drag-down nasty. Read More An Eighteenth-century French Case of Mudslinging

Mittens and the Myth of Madame Deficit

So a few weeks ago, during the Democratic National Convention (which I didn’t watch because I was being a good little author and working on one of my novels –I’m not telling much, only it’s a Victorian historical thriller that takes place in London), I ran across this little gem of a picture. Read More Mittens and the Myth of Madame Deficit

“Farewell, My Queen” by Chantal Thomas

Well, it seems as though I am on a French Revolution kick this week! There’s my post from Monday about Theresia Tallien, and now there’s this. “Farewell, My Queen” by Chantal Thomas tells the story of Marie Antoinette’s last few days at Versailles right after the fall of the Bastille on July 14, 1789.  The book was the winner of the 2002 Prix Femina, and a movie based on the novel starring Diane Kruger as Marie Antoinette was released in France earlier this year. Read More “Farewell, My Queen” by Chantal Thomas