On #MooreandMe, Pt. II: Naomi Wolf and Protecting Accusers’ Anonymity

Part of what has so revived the #MooreandMe Twitter hashtag this week is renowned feminist Naomi Wolf’s January 5 op-ed for the Guardian, titled “Julian Assange’s sex-crime accusers deserve to be named.” Wolf argues that shielding rape accusers from the public spotlight infantilizes women, allows unethical organizations to hush up accusations, and is morally irresponsible. Read More On #MooreandMe, Pt. II: Naomi Wolf and Protecting Accusers’ Anonymity

On #MooreandMe, Pt. I: How the Rhetorical “Rape Card” Silences Women

On December 15, Sady Doyle of Tiger Beatdown launched #Mooreandme, the Twitter hashtag protest designed to call out progressive icon Michael Moore, and while Moore has since clarified his views and voiced an apology to Doyle, the #MooreandMe tag lives on.

Jockeying over the legitimacy of the accusations against Assange has metastasized into wider debate about the nature of rape allegations everywhere, whether accusers/accused should be shielded behind anonymity, and whether women have an ace in the hole in the form of the so-called “rape card.” Read More On #MooreandMe, Pt. I: How the Rhetorical “Rape Card” Silences Women