Book Review: Moriarty by Anthony Horowitz

Though I have not read or watched everything the Sherlock world has to offer, I am fond of smart people who are good at their job, so the consulting detective’s universe is interesting to me. Between those characters and enjoying Anthony Horowitz’s work on Foyle’s War, I wanted to like Moriarty a lot more than I did.

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Reading the Man Booker Prize 2014: How to Be Both by Ali Smith

It’s literature prize season, and the shortlist for the Man Booker Prize has been revealed! On its way to becoming the most important prize of them all, the Man Booker jury now accepts entries from all English-speaking writers published in the UK, opening up the contest for the American market. The much-anticipated onslaught of American novels has not happened this year, with only two writers making it onto the list of six finalists. There aren’t many big surprises, other than David Mitchell staying behind *boo hiss*, but at first glance, 2014 looks like a good year. Read More Reading the Man Booker Prize 2014: How to Be Both by Ali Smith

Miss Fisher’s Murder Mysteries

As my beloved Elementary has been on a two-week break (it’s back next week, I promise), I thought I’d highlight an Australian TV show that is a recent obsession. Read More Miss Fisher’s Murder Mysteries

Little-Known Gems: Miss Pym Disposes by Josephine Tey

I had never heard of Josephine Tey until I was given The Daughter Of Time, her most famous novel, which must have found a few new readers this year when Richard III’s remains were identified in Leicester. I loved the book, and was given the entire collection of her novels shortly after (high fives and admiration for my husband). Not much is known of Josephine Tey, whose real name was Elizabeth Mackintosh, other than the fact that she was a private person who left work to care for her elderly father, never married, and left her estate to the National Trust when she died in 1952. Read More Little-Known Gems: Miss Pym Disposes by Josephine Tey

Book Review: “The Cuckoo’s Calling,” by Robert Galbraith

On one of those rare days that I spent several hours away from my computer and away from Tumblr, news broke that J.K. Rowling had written a new book under a pseudonym. I came home to a Tumblr dashboard full of posts relaying the news and I knew instantly that I’d be reading this book. There had been an almost universal ambivalence about The Casual Vacancy, Rowling’s other post-Potter writing endeavor. But the synopsis of this new book — The Cuckoo’s Calling — sounded different. For one thing, it was a mystery novel, which Rowling had often expressed a desire to write. For another, even the synopsis sounded more engaging. How could a book about “Detective Cormoran Strike” be boring? Read More Book Review: “The Cuckoo’s Calling,” by Robert Galbraith

Ask A Librarian: What Should I Read?

Hello, darling readers! Welcome to Persephone’s new readers’ advisory column. I’m a state-certified librarian, an inveterate bookworm, and I learned reader’s advisory from arguably the most famous reader’s advisor of all, Nancy Pearl. Read More Ask A Librarian: What Should I Read?

Book Review: Kansas City Noir, edited by Steve Paul

For a few years now, I’ve meant to read one of the books from Akashic’s city-based Noir series. And for no good reason, I didn’t get around to one until Kansas City Noir, edited by Steve Paul. I don’t believe I’ve ever been to Kansas City; if I have, it was a mere drive-through during one of the cross-country trips we took when I was a kid. Because of that, I wonder if I would have connected to the stories more if I was already familiar with the locale.

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