Why Rolling Stone’s Rape Story Apology Is Irresponsible

It was a story that ricocheted across the Internet, leaving waves of shock and outrage in its path.

On November 19, Rolling Stone reporter Sabrina Rubin Erdely published an article about rapes committed by members of a University of Virginia fraternity — and cover-ups by the school’s administration. On December 5th, the magazine issued a retraction in which it apologized for not reaching out to the accused rapists of Erdely’s source, a woman identified as Jackie, and claiming her story had discrepancies — aka, journalism code for “please don’t sue us for libel.”

But while Rolling Stone‘s quasi-retraction may be a shrewd legal move, it is irresponsible for several reasons — most significantly because it reinforces media pressure to treat rape charges and victims with skepticism. Read More Why Rolling Stone’s Rape Story Apology Is Irresponsible

Fox News Stretches Bounds Of Reason To Explain Anger Toward Cosby

As a rule, I try to avoid Fox News. Entering its fray is akin to heading into the woods butt-naked, then hitting a hornet’s nest repeatedly with a stick. I know it will sting and I’ll curse and be covered in welts…so why go there?

But in reading about Bill Cosby and the mounting allegations of sexual abuse he’s facing, I came across a Fox News story so insulting, it has to be commented on — not only because it offends my liberal sensibilities, but because it offends the conservative audience Fox ostensibly serves…and, indeed, the entirety of human kind. Read More Fox News Stretches Bounds Of Reason To Explain Anger Toward Cosby

On #MooreandMe, Pt. I: How the Rhetorical “Rape Card” Silences Women

On December 15, Sady Doyle of Tiger Beatdown launched #Mooreandme, the Twitter hashtag protest designed to call out progressive icon Michael Moore, and while Moore has since clarified his views and voiced an apology to Doyle, the #MooreandMe tag lives on.

Jockeying over the legitimacy of the accusations against Assange has metastasized into wider debate about the nature of rape allegations everywhere, whether accusers/accused should be shielded behind anonymity, and whether women have an ace in the hole in the form of the so-called “rape card.” Read More On #MooreandMe, Pt. I: How the Rhetorical “Rape Card” Silences Women