Reading List: Top 5 Favorite Books – 2014

Ah yes, we’re in the thick of the year-end “best of” lists floating about the internet, but far be it from me to miss out on telling you what my favorites were this year. Are you in need of reading suggestions? Look no further.

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Modern Classics: Infinite Jest by David Foster Wallace

There are certain books that people like to pretend they have read, although very few actually have. Ulysses is one of them, and I never got my head around that one. With Infinite Jest, I persevered, and it was worth it. Read More Modern Classics: Infinite Jest by David Foster Wallace

Book Review: The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness, by Michelle Alexander

This book had been on my to-read list for a few years, which is not an unusually long time for me. I knew, though, that I had to prioritize this one when I saw Angela Davis speak in Hyde Park last month. She spoke about feminism and race and Assata Shakur (if you haven’t heard her story go look it up!) – and the issue of abolition. I had never heard of this movement, though I knew theoretically that the so-called war on drugs fell disproportionately heavily on black and brown men – and growing numbers of women. This book was one of the ones that she recommended for those of us that didn’t already have an intimate knowledge of what she was talking about already to pick up and read. Read More Book Review: The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness, by Michelle Alexander

Expat Ramblings: Watching The English, Part 2

I’m so glad I came across Kate Fox’s book – being able to formulate and understand rules helps me a lot generally, and in this case I can finally put some things into words that have vaguely puzzled me for a while now. Yes, many things about the English are weird. So finally making sense of the weirdness comes as a relief. Read More Expat Ramblings: Watching The English, Part 2

Lit Mags I Have Known: A Short Guide

Often I hear it said that the only people who read literary magazines are other writers. There might be some truth to that, but it doesn’t have to be that way. In a time where many newspapers and magazines are still not giving women their equitable due, sometimes it pays to look off the beaten path for new voices. Read More Lit Mags I Have Known: A Short Guide

Detropia: A Review

Let me tell you a story about Detroit. Once upon a time, cars were made in Detroit. Because of the cars, people had good jobs. They could afford a good lifestyle, with college for the kids and maybe a cottage up north. People flocked to Detroit from all corners of the US of A (and world) for these opportunities. And then the jobs left. They went to China or Mexico. The jobs that remained gave lower wages with fewer benefits so that no one had any money anymore. Buildings crumbled. A lot of people moved out of the city. Housing prices plummeted. Businesses suffered.

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Recipe Review: Curried Coconut Lentil Soup

This week I am trying something new. Instead of posting one of “my own” recipes (in quotation marks because I know I did not come up with them out of the blue, I’ve just been making them for so long that they are probably nothing like the original source material that I’ve forgotten by now anyway), I will be reviewing a new recipe I tried. I found this one for a great curried coconut lentil soup via foodgawker and it was the warm colors coupled with the deliciousness potential that drew me in. Read More Recipe Review: Curried Coconut Lentil Soup

Book Review: “The Talented Mr. Ripley” by Patricia Highsmith

If it’s odd that one of my favorite books centers around a sociopathic murderer, I don’t care.

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