What I Learned at Women 2.0

Last week, the Computer History Museum in Mountain View hosted the fifth annual Women 2.0 PITCH Conference. PITCH is a conference for women in tech to gather and mingle and learn from one another. Developers chat with venture capitalists, designers schmooze with product managers, and start-up founders hand out business cards like there’s no tomorrow.

The Women 2.0 crew pulled in the big guns for the thousand attendees, recruiting the founders and CEOs of some of the biggest start-ups in the world as speakers and panelists. These women waxed poetic – literally, Caterina Fake of Flickr recited some Wallace Stevens – about humanizing vs. dehumanizing technology, bootstrapping strategies, and influencing company culture from the top down. Here are a few pearls of wisdom, but follow them yourself to hear it straight from the source:

Continue reading

Decisions, Decisions: Women Running for Public Office

Yesterday, the Huffington Post published a thorough and interesting article about the state of women in the US Senate and the disparity between the Republican and Democratic Parties in tapping female candidates. The whole thing is worth a read, especially the slideshow at the end featuring the thirteen women running for Senate next year. But I was hoping we could start a discussion of our smart, engaged readership here at Persephone about the section discussing the challenges of persuading women to run for higher office. Continue reading

Do Polls Underestimate Female Candidates?

A study published last fall in the academic journal Political Behavior but that has only recently gained attention in the popular media suggests that pre-election polls consistently underestimate the success of female political candidates. Unsurprisingly, this phenomenon is particularly strong in states that traditionally have a more conservative culture when it comes to gender roles. Continue reading

Must Women’s Success Be Measured Against Men’s to Count?

Two articles that recently discussed women in business this week made me want to puke. The first one is from the Wall Street Journal and asked the question “What’s holding back women entrepreneurs?” It says that although women are starting their own businesses at much higher rates than men ““ the women-owned businesses are not as big as the men-owned businesses. Continue reading