Book Review: Women by Chloe Caldwell

Chloe Caldwell writes in such an honest way that Women reads like a journal entry. In fact, I confess to mistaking the novella for memoir at first, having read Caldwell’s other work. However one categorizes it, it’s a compelling story about complicated, obsessive love.

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The Politics of API Women Sisterhood Building

I am all too familiar with the sense of competition that can arise among Asian women. One of my favorite Filipina studies/feminist theorists, Dr. Allyson Goce Tintiangco-Cubales, describes this competition between Asian women (Filipinas specifically within her writing) as the “Mall of Downness,” a belief that Asian women have an inherent sense of competition against one another due to the fact that we have not established a structure of sisterhood that brings us together. Read More The Politics of API Women Sisterhood Building

Kick Rocks, Woman Shamers

Oh, good. This guy again. I think Matt Walsh imagines himself as some sort of caped, high-booted defender of women when he’s just another woman-shaming promoter of “traditional” feminine roles. Read More Kick Rocks, Woman Shamers

Classic Woman-centric Movie Review: Imitation of Life (1959)

Welcome back, Persephoneers! This week’s classic movie pick is a sort of follow-up to some of the discussion sparked by the Miss Representation documentary. Imitation of Life, made in 1959, stars Lana Turner, Juanita Moore, Sandra Dee, Susan Kohner, and John Gavin. The film is based on the 1933 novel by Fannie Hurst and was directed by Douglas Sirk. It was one of the highest grossing films of 1959 and dared to tackle the controversial topics of how society perceives race and gender and how these perceptions can shape people’s lives. Read More Classic Woman-centric Movie Review: Imitation of Life (1959)

Book Review: The Taliban Cricket Club by Timeri N. Murari

With the news of England’s women winning the Ashes, it’s a good time for the women’s game. The teams will play a return series in the winter, where, with a bit of effort on behalf of the cricket boards, their games could draw bigger audiences and increased reporting. Read More Book Review: The Taliban Cricket Club by Timeri N. Murari