Leagues and Leagues of Remarkable Women

It is utterly classic for me to get extraordinarily enthusiastic about a project and then, slowly and inevitably, get dragged down in to the muck and the mire of the details of getting it going. For instance: as a child, I spent hours sculpting the characters for the stories I was of course going to write — excel spreadsheets with the color of hair, shape of forehead, style of dress, and on and on and on. The stories themselves never got all that far off the ground. Read More Leagues and Leagues of Remarkable Women

Kickstartable: 50 Years of Broad Ambition: Ladies of the Barbizon

This week’s Kickstartable feature is one that has fascinated me. 50 Years of Broad Ambition: Ladies of the Barbizon features the history of this glamorous women’s hotel and the career girls who lived there. Read More Kickstartable: 50 Years of Broad Ambition: Ladies of the Barbizon

Happy Birthday, Girl Scouts!

Happy birthday, Girl Scouts!!! This year marks the 100th anniversary of the foundation of Girl Scouts and today is the big day that Juliette Gordon Low first gathered 18 girls to form the first troop. This, of course, means celebration via Girl Scout cookie eating and a stroll through the history of Girl Scouts. Grab your beanies, sashes and try-its, ladies, and prepare to be amazed by the awesome accomplishments of Girl Scouts.

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A Brief History of Women’s History Month

Another year, another March, another Women’s History Month. Like many a feminist, I’ve participated in yearly celebrations and presentations celebrating the contribution of women to our society, but it’s only been recently that I realized I had no knowledge whatsoever of WHM’s history.

If there’s one thing I do know, celebrations of marginalized members of society don’t just spring out of nowhere, like Athena leaping from Zeus’s head. We are just not there yet. Not when a frequent reaction to WHM or BHM is, “Why isn’t there a White Guy History Month?” Not when there’s an actual national debate over where women should be mandated by the state to endure invasive and unnecessary medical procedures in order to procure another, legal medical procedure. If there’s ever been a year to throw a little light onto women’s issues, women’s desires, and women’s contributions to the world, this might be it. Read More A Brief History of Women’s History Month

Women’s History Month: Now That I’m Raising a Woman

I never took much mind to “women’s firsts” (first U.S. female astronaut, first female-owned Indy 500 team, those sorts of things), even though they all happened in my lifetime. I never took much mind, that is, until I became the parent of a girl. Then, as newscasters announced, “Katie Couric is the first woman to anchor the national evening news”, I started to take notice. Read More Women’s History Month: Now That I’m Raising a Woman

The Sad Story of Ruby McCollum

On August 3, 1952, Ruby McCollum walked into the colored waiting room of Dr. C. Leroy Adams’ office in Live Oak, Florida. By the time she walked out and returned home, Dr. Adams had been shot three times in the back and once in the arm. A case that officials wanted to chalk up to a bill dispute quickly became a matter of something else, crossing into civil rights issues, “paramour’s rights,” and mistreatment of the mentally ill. Read More The Sad Story of Ruby McCollum

Badass Ladies of History: Wallis Simpson

So let it be known that Wallis is not a Badass Lady in the same vein as Amelia Earhart or Eleanor Roosevelt or Josephine Baker (though she may have known Jo! They both hung out in Paris during the 30s so it’s highly likely they crossed paths) or other women who actively campaigned for equality and progress. No, Wallis is badass because she lived bravely and openly despite being cast as the Jezebel archetype–a woman scorned, reviled, and hated (by an entire country, no less) for engaging in “mannish” behavior such as divorcing, having affairs, and being “ambitious.” Read More Badass Ladies of History: Wallis Simpson